art, history & archaeology
Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
Reblogged from archaicwonder  213 notes
archaicwonder:

Luristan bronze daggers - Iran, circa 9th-7th Century BC
One with flanged hilt still holding the remains of a wood inlay, terminating in an openwork cage-pommel; another with long triangular blade and penannular guard; and three examples with flanged hilt and fan-shaped knob.
In the 3rd and 4th millennium BC, migrant tribes settled down in the mountainous area of the Zagros Mountains of Iran. The Kassites, an ancient people who spoke neither an Indo-European nor a Semitic language, originated in Luristan (aka Lorestan).
Luristan was invaded and settled by the Iranian Medes in the 2nd millennium BC. The Medes absorbed the indigenous inhabitants of the region, primarily the Elamites and Kassites, by the time the area was conquered by the Persians in the 1st millennium BC. Luristan was successfully integrated into the Achaemenid, Parthian and Sassanian empires.

archaicwonder:

Luristan bronze daggers - Iran, circa 9th-7th Century BC

One with flanged hilt still holding the remains of a wood inlay, terminating in an openwork cage-pommel; another with long triangular blade and penannular guard; and three examples with flanged hilt and fan-shaped knob.

In the 3rd and 4th millennium BC, migrant tribes settled down in the mountainous area of the Zagros Mountains of Iran. The Kassites, an ancient people who spoke neither an Indo-European nor a Semitic language, originated in Luristan (aka Lorestan).

Luristan was invaded and settled by the Iranian Medes in the 2nd millennium BC. The Medes absorbed the indigenous inhabitants of the region, primarily the Elamites and Kassites, by the time the area was conquered by the Persians in the 1st millennium BC. Luristan was successfully integrated into the Achaemenid, Parthian and Sassanian empires.

Reblogged from callandera  111 notes

slowartday:

Christo and Jean Claude, Wrapped Trees, 1997-8

The artists had dreamt of wrapping trees in the 60’s as an environmental art installation and drew many preperatory drawings. 30 years later, in 1998, their dreams were realized in Switzerland. The wrapping was removed on December 14, 1998 and the materials were recycled. The artists did not accept any sponsorship and paid the expenses of the project themselves through the sale of original works to museums, private collectors and galleries.