art, history & archaeology
Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
Reblogged from onlyalittlelost  1,860 notes

The film plays with time to accentuate the families’ economic differences. The Bennets’ clothes are stuck in the 1790s, while Caroline Bingley wears styles from after 1800. Audiences may not detect the difference, but Bingley’s country neighbors do. At a second ball, women ditch their earth-tone dresses for dignified white gowns like the one Caroline Bingley wore to the first one. Everyone is trying to catch up with her.

(Jacqueline Durran, Costume designer)

Reblogged from arfur  139 notes

italianartsociety:

Happy Easter from the Italian Art Society! Today Western Christians celebrate the Resurrection of Jesus. Though not as common as images of the Crucifixion, the events of Easter appear frequently in Italian art. Recorded in all four Gospels, the Resurrection itself was not witnessed and therefore was not visualized by artists until the 12th century. The Noli Me Tangere — Do not Touch Me — and the Doubting Thomas, were other common images designed to celebrate the Risen Christ.

Piero della Francesca, Resurrected Christ, fresco, 1463-5, Pinacoteca Communale, Sansepolcro

Pietro Lorenzetti, Resurrection, c. 1320, fresco, Lower Church, San Francesco, Assisi

Fra Angelico, Resurrection of Christ and Women at the Tomb (Cell 8), 1440-42, fresco, San Marco, Florence

Vecchietta, The Resurrection, 1472, bronze, The Frick Collection, New York

Luca della Robbia, Resurrection, 1442-5, glazed terra cotta, Florence, Duomo

Michelangelo, The Resurrection (recto, detail), 1531-32, black chalk, traces of red chalk, Royal Collection, Windsor

Agnolo Bronzino, Resurrection, 1552, oil on canvas, Santissima Annunziata, Florence

Giotto, Noli me tangere, 1305, fresco, Scrovegni Chapel, Padua

Fra Angelico, Noli me Tangere, ca. 1430, illuminated manuscript, Missal 558, fol. 64v

Andrea del Verrocchio, Doubting Thomas, bronze, 1476-83, Orsanmichele, Florence

Reblogged from shutupcyclops  4,215 notes

Writing Research - Victorian Era

ghostflowerdreams:

In historical fiction it is important to be accurate and the only way to do so is to research the era. What is highly recommended by many writers is to write your story first. While writing your story, mark the parts that you’re not sure are correct and then do the research after you are done. This is to prevent you from from doing unnecessary research that may not be relevant to your work. You want to spend your time wisely!

To begin, the Victorian period formally begins in 1837 (the year Victoria became Queen) and ends in 1901 (the year of her death). 

Names

Society & Life

Commerce

Entertainment & Food

Hygiene, Health & Medicine

Fashion

Dialogue

Justice & Crimes

Reblogged from archaeochick  21 notes
intheshoes-ofthefisherman:

"The Sound of Holy Week"

Bells have been used in the Latin Mass of the Roman Catholic Church since at least the eighth century. A tradition developed of setting aside the bells during Holy Week, the week leading up to Easter Sunday, as their ringing was considered too joyous for such a somber time of the liturgical year and the bells were said to have flown to Rome. When the bells were not in use, they were replaced by a cog rattle—a noisemaker that produces a loud rattling sound when whirled around by its handle. This tradition still continues in certain Latin American countries.
A cog rattle is a relatively simple musical instrument, comprising an integral handle with a fluted cogwheel, and a box that encloses a wooden tongue. When the rattle is spun, the wooden tongue catches on the sharp edges on the cogwheel and produces the raucous sound. In addition to its service in the Mass, this type of instrument was used historically in processions and on naval vessels, where it was used as an alarm. Today, the instrument, often made of metal or plastic, is most commonly found at parties and carnivals.
The extraordinary example of the cog rattle found in the Museum’s collection is a survivor from the Renaissance, and dates from the fifteenth or sixteenth century. The box, or cage, that holds the wooden tongue is decorated with rough carvings, which include a small Roman cross.

Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art

intheshoes-ofthefisherman:

"The Sound of Holy Week"

Bells have been used in the Latin Mass of the Roman Catholic Church since at least the eighth century. A tradition developed of setting aside the bells during Holy Week, the week leading up to Easter Sunday, as their ringing was considered too joyous for such a somber time of the liturgical year and the bells were said to have flown to Rome. When the bells were not in use, they were replaced by a cog rattle—a noisemaker that produces a loud rattling sound when whirled around by its handle. This tradition still continues in certain Latin American countries.

A cog rattle is a relatively simple musical instrument, comprising an integral handle with a fluted cogwheel, and a box that encloses a wooden tongue. When the rattle is spun, the wooden tongue catches on the sharp edges on the cogwheel and produces the raucous sound. In addition to its service in the Mass, this type of instrument was used historically in processions and on naval vessels, where it was used as an alarm. Today, the instrument, often made of metal or plastic, is most commonly found at parties and carnivals.

The extraordinary example of the cog rattle found in the Museum’s collection is a survivor from the Renaissance, and dates from the fifteenth or sixteenth century. The box, or cage, that holds the wooden tongue is decorated with rough carvings, which include a small Roman cross.

Source: The Metropolitan Museum of Art